Posts in 'Reports & Publications'

Reports & Publications
For their 2018-2019 annual project , Youth Fostering Change and Juveniles for Justice both focused on education issues affecting youth in the child welfare and
A practical tool for attorneys and advocates to ensure that youth are in the “most connected placements” -- settings where youth can be connected with their family, the community, and a support system rather than group or institutional care.
In 2016-2017, Juveniles for Justice focused on raising awareness about the impact of juvenile justice costs on youth and families, and creating more rehabilitative alternatives.
The United States incarcerates youth at more than double the rate of any other country in the world. On any given day, almost 50,000 young
The Price of Justice analyzes statutes in all 50 states regarding the cost of court-appointed counsel, including fees for public defenders. In most states, youth or their families must pay for legal assistance even if they are determined to be indigent. Charging families—especially those living in poverty—for “free” attorneys leads to devastating consequences.
This executive summary provides background information on extended foster care and outlines how we developed the National Extended Foster Care Review—a tool for advocates, policymakers,
Every year, 1.5 million youth are arrested across the country. The moment each of these children comes into contact with the police, a record is
Early work experiences and other forms of career exposure remain elusive for many youth, including youth in the child welfare and juvenile justice systems. Nationally,
Despite a growing consensus that solitary confinement harms youth and undermines the rehabilitative goals of the juvenile justice system, the practice remains all too common. At the same time, the field lacks sufficient information on the prevalence of the practice, the alternatives, and the perspectives of affected youth and families. This report uses surveys of public defenders, conversations with youth and families, interviews with correctional administrators, and legal and psychological research to fill these gaps and set forth recommendations for reform.
Reports & Publications
Approximately one million youth appear in juvenile court each year. Costs, fees, fines, or restitution are imposed in every state. These financial penalties increase recidivism, push impoverished young people deeper into the juvenile justice system, exacerbate racial disparities in the juvenile justice system, and heighten economic and emotional distress for families already struggling financially.