Posts in 'Amicus Curiae'

Solitary Confinement & Harsh Conditions
United States District Court for the Southern District of California •

Ms. L. and her 7 year old daughter, S.S., arrived at a United States Port of Entry near San Diego seeking asylum due to a

Access to Counsel
Ohio Supreme Court •

Thirteen-year old L.G. was arrested immediately after being questioned at his school by a school official in the presence of police during a joint investigation.

Juvenile Life Without Parole (JLWOP)
U.S. Supreme Court •

Juvenile Law Center, along with The Promise of Justice Initiative and Children and Family Justice Center, filed an amicus brief in support of Larry Newton’s

Juvenile Life Without Parole (JLWOP)
U.S. Supreme Court •

Shawn Davis is serving a life without parole sentence for a murder conviction when he was 16 years old. He is one of 984 young Black men

Juvenile Life Without Parole (JLWOP)
U.S. Supreme Court •

Karen Howell was convicted under the felony murder doctrine in Tennessee for her involvement with another juvenile and four adult co-defendants in the murder of

Education
Supreme Court of Indiana •

D.Z., a public school student, was questioned as part of an investigation jointly undertaken by the school’s assistant principal and a police officer stationed at

Access to Counsel
Ohio Supreme Court •

We argued that juvenile adjudications are insufficient "to alone sustain proof beyond a reasonable doubt of an element of [an adult felony]" because it contradicts the rehabilitative purpose of Ohio's juvenile justice system.

Juvenile Life Without Parole (JLWOP)
Connecticut Supreme Court •

We argued that parole availability does not remedy a sentencing court's failure to give mitigating effect to the youth-related factors set forth in Miller.

Juvenile Life Without Parole (JLWOP)
North Carolina Supreme Court •

We argued that Miller creates a presumption against sentencing juvenile offenders to life without parole.

Juvenile Life Without Parole (JLWOP)
U.S. Supreme Court •

We argued that Miller and Montgomery establish a presumption against life without parole, which requires a determination that a juvenile has no potential for rehabilitation prior to imposing a life without parole sentence.