Legal Docket

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Juvenile Life Without Parole (JLWOP)
Appellate Court of Illinois, Third Judicial District •

Argued that juvenile's sentence was unconstitutional pursuant to the United States Supreme Court’s ruling in Miller v. Alabama, which banned mandatory life without parole sentences for juveniles.

Juvenile Life Without Parole (JLWOP)
U.S. Supreme Court •

Argued that the automatic exclusion from juvenile court of certain youth charged with murder when combined with the imposition of mandatory sentences is unconstitutional, pursuant to recent Supreme Court rulings in Roper, Graham, and Miller.

Youth Tried as Adults
Ohio Supreme Court •

Arguing that an Ohio statute's presumption that a recorded custodial statement is prima facie voluntary violates constitutional due process requirements.

Juvenile Life Without Parole (JLWOP)
California Supreme Court •

Argued that juvenile's sentence to an extreme term of years sentence deprives them of a meaningful and realistic opportunity to obtain release and is thus unconstitutional pursuant to Graham v. Florida and Miller v. Alabama.

Juvenile Life Without Parole (JLWOP)
Colorado Supreme Court •

We argued that an aggregate term-of-years sentence of 40 to life for nonhomicide offenses committed by a juvenile is the functional equivalent of life without parole and is therefore unconstitutional.

Youth Tried as Adults
Oregon Supreme Court •

Argued that the Oregon Appellate Court's interpretation of the state's juvenile transfer statute was so narrow that virtually all cases for youth aged 12 -14 will qualify for transfer to adult criminal court.

Juvenile Life Without Parole (JLWOP)
Colorado Supreme Court •

We argued that an aggregate sentence of 96 years for second degree murder under a theory of complicity is a nonhomicide crime under Graham because it does not require that a defendant kill or intend to kill, and is the functional equivalent of life without parole because it fails to provide a “meaningful opportunity to obtain release.”

Juvenile Sex Offender Registry (SORNA)
Louisiana Supreme Court •
Argued that placing the words “sex offender” on juvenile's driver’s license imposes stigma and restrictions in violation of procedural due process, as well as infringes reputation rights which are expressly protected by the Louisiana Constitution.