Juvenile Law Center

Pursuing justiceA Juvenile law center Blog

May 23, 2017

For many youth "a cell phone is life."

posted by Anthony Simpson, youth advocate

The stigma attached to being homeless has a massive impact on the prevention and direct treatment of homelessness, regardless the severity of one’s situation. No child should bear the responsibility of acquiring housing alone. These days, though, technology is so accessible and essential to the social sphere of young people. We are never truly alone, are we? During my bouts with homelessness the most common possession I had (as did other teens I’d met in shelters or when we were just looking for a permanent home) was the same object many teenagers have in their pockets - a smartphone. A cell phone is life. It’s a way to keep in touch with friends we’ve had to separate from, how we keep track of time for when the days seemed to blend together between cat naps, and for some, memorabilia of a time before finding ourselves without shelter.

Tags:Youth Fostering Change|Child Welfare and Foster Care|Extended Care and Reentry (Foster Care)|Fostering Connections|Normalcy for Foster Youth|Older Youth with Disabilities|Permanency (Foster Care)|Teens and Technology|Transitions to Adulthood (Foster Care)|Youth Engagement Programs
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May 26, 2016

Letting Kids be Kids: The Strengthening Families Act

posted by Juvenile Law Center

Youth in foster care often describe normalcy as being able to do all the things their friends who are not in foster care get to do: sleep over at a friend’s house, play on a school team, or go on vacation. But foster youth are routinely denied these typical childhood experiences because of the real or perceived need to get advance approval from the child welfare agency or the court.

Tags:Child Welfare and Foster Care|Fostering Connections|Normalcy for Foster Youth|Permanency (Foster Care)|Transitions to Adulthood (Foster Care)
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June 30, 2014

Federal Government Takes Critical Step to Ensure Educational Stability for Foster Youth

posted by Juvenile Law Center

During his time in foster care, Jarrett changed schools six times. One of these moves occurred three weeks before the end of the semester. Because his school records didn’t arrive at his new school on time, Jarrett was not granted permission to take final exams or complete final projects for his courses. His GPA plummeted from 3.6 to 1.4 due to the missing coursework.

There are countless other foster youth like Jarrett—youth who are bounced from living placement to living placement, typically changing schools each time.

Tags:Access to Education|Child Welfare and Foster Care|Fostering Connections|State and Federal Legislation
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May 27, 2014

Growing Up Female in Foster Care: An Interview with Larbriah Morgan, Juvenile Law Center Youth Advocate

posted by Claire Glass, Intern, Juvenile Law Center

On May 13, 2014, the Stoneleigh Foundation held the symposium “What About the Girls?” to address these unique risk factors. Panelists included Malika Saada Saar, executive director of the Human Rights Project for Girls; Leslie Acoca, president of the National Girls Health and Justice Institute; Gwendolyn Bailey, executive director of Youth Service, Inc.; and Larbriah (Briah) Morgan, a Juvenile Law Center Youth Advocate.

Juvenile Law Center intern Claire Glass sat down with Briah after the symposium (and her final exams). They discussed the realities she’ll face when she turns 21 and “ages out” of the system in early June, and how she thinks the system could be improved to help more foster youth both make it to and succeed in college and find stable housing.

Tags:Access to Education|Youth Fostering Change|Access to Healthcare|Child Welfare and Foster Care|Extended Care and Reentry (Foster Care)|Fostering Connections|Normalcy for Foster Youth|Permanency (Foster Care)|Transitions to Adulthood (Foster Care)|Youth Engagement Programs
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May 14, 2014

National Foster Care Month: Letting Foster Kids Be Kids

posted by Juvenile Law Center

While National Foster Care Month reminds us of the unique situation of youth who are removed from their families and placed in foster care, it is also important to think about how strongly youth in foster care just want to be treated like “average” kids. 

Far too often, the foster care system creates barriers to youth having the “normal” experiences of adolescence. Most people don’t realize that in many states, foster youth cannot date, go to sleepovers, work, or participate in extracurricular activities.

Tags:Child Welfare and Foster Care|Fostering Connections|Normalcy for Foster Youth|Permanency (Foster Care)|Transitions to Adulthood (Foster Care)
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