Juvenile Law Center

Pursuing justiceA Juvenile law center Blog

February 13, 2012

Pennsylvania Should Repeal Juvenile Sex Offender Registration Law

posted by Juvenile Law Center

In December 2011, Pennsylvania enacted its version of the federal Adam Walsh Act—a piece of draconian legislation that will require up to lifetime registration for Pennsylvania juveniles convicted of sex offenses. The General Assembly passed the law, and the Governor signed it, despite a steady and persistent chorus of dissent from leading child advocates across the state and nation. Why would children's advocates raise concerns about a new law that ostensibly aims to protect children? Because the law has the potential to destroy more lives than it will protect, while robbing Pennsylvania taxpayers of critical resources.

Tags:Juvenile and Criminal Justice|Juvenile Sex Offender Registration
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February 07, 2012

Governor Corbett's Proposal to Fully Implement the Federal Fostering Connections Act is a Win, Win, Win

posted by Juvenile Law Center

Governor Tom Corbett of Pennsylvania today announced his proposed budget plan for fiscal year 2012-2013, which included a proposal for full implementation of the older youth provisions of the federal Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act (Fostering Connections). Foster youth who age out of care without permanent family supports and connections are one of our most vulnerable populations. These youth, who have histories of abuse and neglect, are strong, resilient, and full of potential, but can easily fall through the cracks as they enter adulthood. They deserve better—and we as a nation can do better.

Tags:Child Welfare and Foster Care|Fostering Connections|Normalcy for Foster Youth|Permanency (Foster Care)|Transitions to Adulthood (Foster Care)
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January 27, 2012

It's Time to Ban Sentences of Life Without Parole for Juveniles

posted by Juvenile Law Center

Are you the same person you were when you were 14 years old?

Or have you gained some insight and wisdom, and become more responsible since then? With few exceptions, we all experience dramatic changes in the way we think and handle ourselves as we move into adulthood. But what if a 14-year-old makes a terrible decision that he can't take back—something that resulted in the death of another person? Does the fact that he made a horrible decision suddenly erase his innate capacity for change? Settled research says no.

Tags:Juvenile and Criminal Justice|Juvenile Life Without Parole (JLWOP)
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December 01, 2011

Introducing "Pursuing Justice," Juvenile Law Center's new blog!

posted by Robert Schwartz and Marsha Levick

Welcome to "Pursuing Justice: The Blog." As we launch our new website, we now wade into this cyberspace of news and opinion, where we hope to bring you our news and views about the ever-changing world of children and the law. We will offer timely and relevant updates on the latest developments in our field and provide expert insights into headline news about children and the law for our readers, friends, and supporters. Juvenile Law Center's unique status as the nation's oldest public interest law firm for children allows us to provide unique perspectives on the stories making headlines and emerging trends.

We founded Juvenile Law Center in 1975. If we close our eyes, we can still clearly see our first office—the half-smoked glass door with the name "Juvenile Law Center of Philadelphia" neatly printed on the outside; the three interior rooms configured to include a waiting room, an office, and an examination room; the worn hallway common to older office buildings in downtown Philadelphia in the mid 1970s. This was the first of many homes for Juvenile Law Center...

Tags:Child Welfare and Foster Care|Juvenile and Criminal Justice|News and Announcements
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